Haumea is Hawaiian Mother-Goddess of Fertility & Childbirth and represents the Earth. Her children, Pele and Hiʻiaka, among many others, are said to have been born from different parts of her body. ʻUlu (Artocarpus altilis) or breadfruit tree is one of her best-known kino.
Hiʻiaka-i-ka-poli-o-Pele is Goddess of Lightning, Journeys, Pathways and Wayfarers. Hiʻiaka is Peleʻs favorite sister and confidant, known for her sacred lightning pāʻū or skirt. Hala (Pandanus tectorius) is her signature kino. Hala has many uses; leaves were made into plaited blankets, mats, pillows and sails.
Hina is Goddess of the Moon. Hina is pursued by men and other creatures, so after becoming tired of this harassment, she fled to the moon and became its goddess. Wauke (Broussonetia papyrifera) or paper mulberry, is one of her best-known kino. She is the first kapa pounder, wauke bark is used for kapa making.
Hinaʻōpūhalakoʻa is Goddess of Corals & Spiny Sea Creatures. Keʻākoʻakoʻa is one of her kino lau. Porites compressa is an endemic finger coral that is common on most islands, and forms massive colonies. From her reef, Māui may have secured a shell to make his famous fishhook, Manaiakalani, to pull the separated islands together and ease traveling for people.
Hopoe is a Goddess of Hula, and companion of Hiʻiaka. She was turned to stone by Pele, angered because Hiʻiaka took too long to return from her quest to retrieve Peleʻs lover, Lohiʻau. ʻŌhiʻa lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) is the major kino lau of Hopoe.
Ka'alaenuiahina (The great mudhen of Hina) is a Sorcery Goddess, who held the secret of making fire in the days before humans could do so. 'Alae 'ula (Gallinula galena sandvicensis) is her kino. Also known as the Hawaiian Moorhen, this secretive native waterbird is found only on O'ahu and Kau’ai in freshwater ponds.
Kaiona is Goddess of Ka'ala, the highest peak of O'ahu. Said to be both blind and deaf, she helped those lost in the forest by sending an 'iwa bird to guide them to a trail leading to the lowlands. Frigata Minor is one of her kino. 'Iwa is known for stealing food from other seabirds, so to call someone an 'iwa is to suggest they are a thief.
Laka is the Goddess of Hula, Forests, Love and Beauty. ʻIeʻie (Freycinetia arborea) is one of her kino lau. ʻIeʻie is one of five plants placed on hālau hula altars to Laka. The plant's aerial roots were woven into helmets, fish traps, and baskets, and its showy orange-yellow flowers were used for lei.
Lea is Goddess of Canoes. 'Elepaio (Chasiempis sandwiebensis) is he best-known kino. Through the behavior of 'elepaio, the kahuna kālai wa'a (canoe carving specialist) could make a selection of the right koa tree to transform into a voyaging canoe.
Pele is the Goddess of Fire & Volcanoes, ʻŌhelo (Vaccinium reticulatum) is one of her kino lau. Offerings of ʻōhelo foliage and berries to Pele are made into Kīlauea volcano, where she resides. The fruit, a relative of cranberries, are a favorite food of nēnē (Hawaiian Goose).
Poliʻahu is the Snow Goddess of Mauna Kea. In a famous legend, Poliaʻhu meets a mysterious stranger who challenges her to a holua sled race, who later reveals herself as her nemesis, Pele. Mauna Kea silversword (Argyroxiphium sandwicense subsp. sandwicense) or ʻahinahina is one of her alpine kino and is critically endangered.
Uli is Goddess of Sorcery, Serenity & Resuscitation. Uli was the most important female deity in ancient times, as she was Heavenly Mother of gods and goddesses. ʻŌhā wai (Clermontia drepanomorpha) is one of her kino lau. ʻŌhā wai is the Hawaiian name for Clermontia, a group of lobelioids (bellflower) found only in Hawaiʻi.
Wahine-ʻōmaʻo, translated as ‘green woman’ is a Goddess who was companion of Hiʻiaka on her journey to retrieve Lohiʻau. After Lohiʻau died of love for Pele, Hiʻiaka and Wahine-ʻōmaʻo with herbs and long prayers restored him to life. Palapalai (Microlepia strigosa), a delicate native fern is her kino.

Haumea is Hawaiian Mother-Goddess of Fertility & Childbirth and represents the Earth. Her children, Pele and Hiʻiaka, among many others, are said to have been born from different parts of her body. ʻUlu (Artocarpus altilis) or breadfruit tree is one of her best-known kino. Hiʻiaka-i-ka-poli-o-Pele is Goddess of Lightning, Journeys, Pathways and Wayfarers. Hiʻiaka is Peleʻs favorite sister and confidant, known for her sacred lightning pāʻū or skirt. Hala (Pandanus tectorius) is her signature kino. Hala has many uses; leaves were made into plaited blankets, mats, pillows and sails. Hina is Goddess of the Moon. Hina is pursued by men and other creatures, so after becoming tired of this harassment, she fled to the moon and became its goddess. Wauke (Broussonetia papyrifera) or paper mulberry, is one of her best-known kino. She is the first kapa pounder, wauke bark is used for kapa making. Hinaʻōpūhalakoʻa is Goddess of Corals & Spiny Sea Creatures. Keʻākoʻakoʻa is one of her kino lau. Porites compressa is an endemic finger coral that is common on most islands, and forms massive colonies. From her reef, Māui may have secured a shell to make his famous fishhook, Manaiakalani, to pull the separated islands together and ease traveling for people. Hopoe is a Goddess of Hula, and companion of Hiʻiaka. She was turned to stone by Pele, angered because Hiʻiaka took too long to return from her quest to retrieve Peleʻs lover, Lohiʻau. ʻŌhiʻa lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) is the major kino lau of Hopoe. Ka'alaenuiahina (The great mudhen of Hina) is a Sorcery Goddess, who held the secret of making fire in the days before humans could do so. 'Alae 'ula (Gallinula galena sandvicensis) is her kino. Also known as the Hawaiian Moorhen, this secretive native waterbird is found only on O'ahu and Kau’ai in freshwater ponds. Kaiona is Goddess of Ka'ala, the highest peak of O'ahu. Said to be both blind and deaf, she helped those lost in the forest by sending an 'iwa bird to guide them to a trail leading to the lowlands. Frigata Minor is one of her kino. 'Iwa is known for stealing food from other seabirds, so to call someone an 'iwa is to suggest they are a thief. Laka is the Goddess of Hula, Forests, Love and Beauty. ʻIeʻie (Freycinetia arborea) is one of her kino lau. ʻIeʻie is one of five plants placed on hālau hula altars to Laka. The plant's aerial roots were woven into helmets, fish traps, and baskets, and its showy orange-yellow flowers were used for lei. Lea is Goddess of Canoes. 'Elepaio (Chasiempis sandwiebensis) is he best-known kino. Through the behavior of 'elepaio, the kahuna kālai wa'a (canoe carving specialist) could make a selection of the right koa tree to transform into a voyaging canoe. Pele is the Goddess of Fire & Volcanoes, ʻŌhelo (Vaccinium reticulatum) is one of her kino lau. Offerings of ʻōhelo foliage and berries to Pele are made into Kīlauea volcano, where she resides. The fruit, a relative of cranberries, are a favorite food of nēnē (Hawaiian Goose). Poliʻahu is the Snow Goddess of Mauna Kea. In a famous legend, Poliaʻhu meets a mysterious stranger who challenges her to a holua sled race, who later reveals herself as her nemesis, Pele. Mauna Kea silversword (Argyroxiphium sandwicense subsp. sandwicense) or ʻahinahina is one of her alpine kino and is critically endangered. Uli is Goddess of Sorcery, Serenity & Resuscitation. Uli was the most important female deity in ancient times, as she was Heavenly Mother of gods and goddesses. ʻŌhā wai (Clermontia drepanomorpha) is one of her kino lau. ʻŌhā wai is the Hawaiian name for Clermontia, a group of lobelioids (bellflower) found only in Hawaiʻi. Wahine-ʻōmaʻo, translated as ‘green woman’ is a Goddess who was companion of Hiʻiaka on her journey to retrieve Lohiʻau. After Lohiʻau died of love for Pele, Hiʻiaka and Wahine-ʻōmaʻo with herbs and long prayers restored him to life. Palapalai (Microlepia strigosa), a delicate native fern is her kino.

Goddess

2017

digital print

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This series celebrates Hawaiian Goddesses and their kino lau, the goddesses’ physical manifestation as a plant or animal. Goddesses were modeled by Hawaiian women working in conservation, the modern-day keepers of the forest, oceans, and lowlands.

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